Interesting article on Grammar

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Diogenese
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Interesting article on Grammar

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Postby Diogenese » Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:46 am

A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five. :roll:

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Underdog
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Re: Interesting article on Grammar

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Postby Underdog » Tue Jul 31, 2018 1:00 pm

That article is so on fleek.
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Diogenese
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Re: Interesting article on Grammar

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Postby Diogenese » Tue Jul 31, 2018 1:18 pm

Exactly, and I had to go look up what "fleek" means :augh:

Unless it is Latin, which isn't used on conversation and is mostly used to name new organisms with names nobody outside scientists ever uses, it is going to change.

The counterargument is that it degrades communication, it does, it makes it more difficult to understand what someone is saying if you aren't using a common rule set, but grammar rules are always going to be trumped (you should excuse the term) with grammar usage.

Unless of course you are in charge of the French Language. :eek:

https://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/learn- ... uter-terms
A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five. :roll:

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Re: Interesting article on Grammar

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Postby Underdog » Tue Jul 31, 2018 2:51 pm

As long as I can still judge people who confuse lose/loose, your/you're, to/too and their/there/they're.
I bought my friend an elephant for his room. He said, "Thanks." I said, "Don't mention it."

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